Keiley O'Brien looks forward to a career as a grain buyer in the central west

Former Gulargambone resident Keiley O’Brien has more than a grain of hope in her career in agriculture, and she wants to help change the national grain industry to benefit local producers.

A grain of hope: Former Gulargambone resident Keiley O'Brien has set her sights on improving Australia's grain industry upon completing University. Photo: Contributed

A grain of hope: Former Gulargambone resident Keiley O'Brien has set her sights on improving Australia's grain industry upon completing University. Photo: Contributed

And she is determined she will succeed.

The goal of working within the grain industry just got a whole lot easier, when Keiley was named as a recipient of a Rural Scholarship this year.

Keiley is currently undertaking a four year double degree course focusing on Agriculture and Business at the University of New England in Armidale.

Now in her third year, Keiley is passionate about youth in agriculture and has set her sights on a career as a grain buyer in the central west upon completing university.

She hopes to work to develop a more streamlined and technologically advanced grain receival/feedback system to benefit producers nationwide.

Growing up in Gulargambone, Keiley lived in town and wasn’t from a farming background.

In high school she became interested in agriculture and started showing cows across Australia.

She attended St John’s College in Dubbo from Years 7 to 9, and completed her finals years of high school at Yanco Agricultural High School.

She decided to try her hand at judging categories, including grain, which was where she developed her interest.

Work experience at GrainCorp in Gulargambone and Fletchers Grain in Dubbo, allowed her to develop a wide variety of skills and knowledge of the grains industry.

“I also want to spend some time working to develop more real time harvest receival technologies,” she said.

“I would like to see instantaneous updates and emails sent to growers as soon as there grain is tested on-site. 

“I’ve seen firsthand how a lack of communication at harvest time between receival operators, growers, contractors and truck drivers can lead to the downgrade of grain and ultimately a loss of quality and profit because messages or previous result information wasn’t passed on.”