Clifton Grove residents want kangaroo deaths to stop

INHUMANE: Clifton Grove residents Andrew Usher, Peter West and John Pullen were distraught to discover a kangaroo had been intentionally hit. Photo: JUDE KEOGH 0909jkroo3
INHUMANE: Clifton Grove residents Andrew Usher, Peter West and John Pullen were distraught to discover a kangaroo had been intentionally hit. Photo: JUDE KEOGH 0909jkroo3

ON Saturday, a male eastern grey kangaroo had been eating grass and watching Peter West and his wife garden on their property in Clifton Grove. 

By Sunday, the kangaroo had been run over on purpose by a white utility and killed. 

Mr West said the incident occurred just after midnight.

“On this occasion, the motorist drove at speed down our road and off the bitumen onto the grass verge,” he said. 

He said similar incidents involving four-wheel-drives had been occurring for the past three years and residents were sick of it.

“We moved to Clifton Grove for the peace and quiet, the wildlife and the great scenery and the kangaroos are something we admire,” he said. 

“We’re frustrated and disgusted about the conduct of the people who do this – it’s very dangerous behaviour and it’s inhumane.”

Mr West said tracks on the grass showed the driver had hooked the utility hard, with fur left behind at the point of collision.

“With the speed of the car, the kangaroo’s gone five or six metres,” he said. 

Central West Police District crime manager Bruce Grassick said the matter had been reported and police were investigating, using footage they received.  

“If people are intentionally trying to run kangaroos down, it is an offence,” he said. 

“If they cause death to the animal, that’s aggravated cruelty and it carries quite a significant penalty.”

Detective Inspector Grassick said patrols had been conducted in the area previously following other incidents and if residents witnessed similar behaviour, they should call police.

Two men from Orange were sent to jail for 10 months in May for attacking a kangaroo with a knife and filming the act. 

The offence can attract up to five years’ jail and fines up to $22,000.