Western NSW students receive a Victor Chang School Science Award

Young Einsteins: The Year 11 Victor Chang School Science Award recipients, who hail from across western NSW. Photo: Belinda Soole.
Young Einsteins: The Year 11 Victor Chang School Science Award recipients, who hail from across western NSW. Photo: Belinda Soole.

Thirteen students across western NSW were recognised for their commitment and passion for science at a special awards ceremony last week.

The prestigious Victor Chang School Science Awards were presented to the Year 11 students who hailed from Lithgow, Blayney, Cowra, Dubbo, Forbes, Gilgandra, Gulgong, Molong, Orange, Oberon, Trangie, Yeoval and Bathurst.

The award is named after the late cardiac surgeon and aims to raise community awareness and appreciation of the important contribution scientists can make to our everyday lives.

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In each of the students Citation, which was read out at the ceremony, some of the main points included their love and dedication to learning.

In the Citation for Yeoval Central School student Bridgett Smith it touched on her dedication.

“Bridgett has been an exceptional student in both her chosen Year 11 science courses of biology and chemistry.

“Her attitude and dedication toward her studies is not only displayed in science but in all of her studies.”

Similarly in Gilgandra High student, Emma Bunter’s Citation it revealed she strives to achieve an exceptionally high standard.

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“She has a history of academic success across a variety of subjects… Emma studies biology at Gilgandra High School and chemistry via Dubbo school of distance education.”

The recipients will join more than 200 students from across NSW on a tour of the Victor Chang Institute to learn first-hand from world-renowned scientists.

Dr Alastair Stewart from the Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute was the special guest at the event, which was held at Dubbo College Senior Campus on November 29.

In his address at the ceremony, Dr Stewart said hoped the students consider a career in science.

“I think it’s a really beautiful world to be in and we need more of these people, particularly as our society changes over the years to come,” Dr Stewart said.

“We need innovation in Australia… and hopefully we’ll be able to see some of you and host you in Sydney in a few weeks time...”