Bill Tatt: drought recovery may take five to seven years

Stock and property: Bill Tatt (pictured) talks about how long the drought recovery may take, public holidays affecting livestock sales and more. Photo: File.
Stock and property: Bill Tatt (pictured) talks about how long the drought recovery may take, public holidays affecting livestock sales and more. Photo: File.

Week Ending 15/03/19

It is interesting to observe peoples and companies and their thoughts on the ramification of this prolonged drought.

Speaking with one of the buyers representing a major processor they appear to have very strong views about the on-going effects of the drought, if it was to rain tomorrow in the registrations required, they feel that the recovery and drag time could be as long as five to seven years.

That is very serious indeed, but they also think for every month longer that the drought lasts we could add an extra year to complete the healing process within the industry.

An indication of the supply of cattle to works is that some Queensland processor have withdrawn all over the hook offers content in the knowledge that they have enough stock secured to see them through until the end of March.

One NSW processor told the column that they were virtually booked out until the end of April.

The column appreciates that the upcoming public holidays are a long way off but in these difficult drought related times vendors should in discussion with their agents have a clear strategy for marketing their livestock.

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From the middle of April, the 12th to be exact, when the Sydney Royal Easter Show commences selling days and processing days are thrown into chaos.

From the 19th (Good Friday) and the 22nd (Easter Monday) no sale will be held and more than likely no sales on Thursday, April 18.

Then on Thursday, April 25 we have Anzac Day. So, in two weeks towards the end of April we miss three days which as a general rule has an adverse effect on marketing.

Four sales ago Dubbo agents drew for 7100 head for their Thursday cattle sale.

That draw was followed by 6500 head, then 5300 and this Thursday, March agents have mustered 3360 cattle.

ALSO MAKING NEWS:

Numbers appear to be in decline but if the anticipated rain does not arrive, numbers wise we could see the flood gates open again next week.

My favourite and only weather forecaster who I ever take notice of is a gentleman by the name of Peter Nelson.

He has a historical take on weather and his records go back to when recordings began. Accordingly, he reports that our area had many hot summers between 1875 to 1906. According to Peter these records show that we did at time have summers hotter than the last one.

These previous temperature records were considered absolute until in 1998 BOM decided that only records since 1910 would be used. According to Peter this is a sad state of affairs.