Pews or a pulpit: Church sells off everything but the baptismal font

Would a pulpit be the ideal finishing touch for your home?

Or maybe you're in need a pew for the back deck, or think a slightly used grand organ will add that much-needed musical touch?

If the answer's yes, then the Uniting Church in the NSW Central West town of Orange has a clearance sale right up your alley.

The church is selling off much of its former property at a special sale on federal election day, Saturday, May 18, from 9am on site at the Bathurst Road building.

The church has closed. It was passed in at auction on Friday May 3, and is now up for sale, as vacant possession for $825,000.

That means just about everything inside, ranging from the pews to the pulpit, the organ, vases, choir seats, bibles and more, plus toys and equipment formerly used by the church's playgroup, is up for grabs.

Past chairman of the Five Ways congregation Ken Allen said some of the property, including wall plaques and the baptismal font would be going to the church's Anson Street Wesley Uniting Church building.

"But you only need one pulpit," he said.

He said they were working out appropriate prices to place on the items.

It's certainly got a good sound.

Richard Dutton, church organist

There are 19 pews of various sizes. Mr Allen said he expected the smaller pews would be priced at $300 each with the larger ones for sale at $350.

There are also two large choir seats up for grabs as well as a host of miscellaneous items.

"A lot of this stuff doesn't have a lot of value anymore, if we could get a dollar or $2 [that would be good]," he said of the range of smaller items on sale.

Big ticket items include the pulpit and the church organ.

Richard Dutton plays the Five Ways church organ which is up for sale as part of the clearance as Ken Allen looks on. Photo: JUDE KEOGH 0509jkchurch1

Richard Dutton plays the Five Ways church organ which is up for sale as part of the clearance as Ken Allen looks on. Photo: JUDE KEOGH 0509jkchurch1

Mr Allen said the pulpit might suit a handyman who could convert it into a home bar.

"You could really sit around this drinking all day," he said leaning on the wooden structure.

The church organ is only about 20 years old.

A plaque on the wall next to it shows that parishioner Ivy Jupp left a bequest after she died in 1995 and some of the money was used to buy the organ.

"It's certainly got a good sound," said the church organist Richard Dutton who played it for a last time when the Central Western Daily attended a working bee to clean up the building last week.

He said it was hoped a school or maybe the Conservatorium of Music would buy the organ which was valued at $35,000 when new in 1996.

Mr Allen said it was disappointing to see the items being sold and the church closed.

"It's very sad, but when you have a look at the cost of insuring a building and the upkeep, and when you've got another church just as expensive, [it has to happen]," he said.