Dubbo youngsters explore art through Moorambilla Voices program

Resilience: Just a few of the Dubbo students who've been invited to participate in the program. Photo: Noni Caroll.

Resilience: Just a few of the Dubbo students who've been invited to participate in the program. Photo: Noni Caroll.

Artists, children and other volunteers from across western New South Wales have come to the town of Barradine in order to work on their artistic skills in the Moorambilla Voices program.

The program, which this year will host over 300 students, invites youngsters to hone their chosen artistic trade at a series of workshops before inviting them to perform across several gala performances at the Dubbo Regional Theatre.

This year, the artists and students sought inspiration from one of the Central West's most resilient and enduring ecosystems, the Macquarie marshes, an area that left a big impression on the members of the program.

"When we were out at the Macquarie marshes, I felt a small piece of what the locals feel every day," Composer Andrew Howes said.

"The drought is intense but the spirit to win through is there."

"There's a real sense of promise and hope, in spite of the dryness," Mr Howes said.

The arts program, which has been running for over a decade now, chose the marshes as a point of inspiration due to the area's enduring nature despite the harsh drought conditions impacting the region, which organisers say is a tale of resilience mirroring the continued hard work of the children and their drought-stricken communities despite the ongoing circumstances.

Johnathan Stait, a Dubbo student who has been a part of the Moorambilla Voices Boys program for 3 years, says the program is something that he's grown to look forward to whenever the time comes to get involved again.

"It's something that I look forward to every year," Mr Stait said.

"This year is especially awesome because I loved to hearing the amazing way the creation story describes the land in the Macquarie marshes."

"I love the singing rehearsals most of all because I take a lot of life skills away from learning music."

"The way Michelle teaches us is different but it is really helpful for all of us."

The program's residency camp will run in Baradine from August 7 until August 18, where the kids will compose and choreograph their performances.