WIRES snake handler Jacob McGoldrick expecting a busy season as warm weather leads to early activity

Slithering in: WIRES snake handler Jacob McGoldrick is expecting a long and busy season as the reptiles come out early on the hunt for water and food. Photo: CHRIS BATH
Slithering in: WIRES snake handler Jacob McGoldrick is expecting a long and busy season as the reptiles come out early on the hunt for water and food. Photo: CHRIS BATH

As the days heat up so do the phone calls for snake handler Jacob McGoldrick, who is preparing for a long and busy season relocating the region's scaly residents.

Snake season has arrived early this year on the back of the warmer days and dry conditions, and while Mr McGoldrick said there won't be any more snakes than usual this year, "there will be more sightings."

"The snakes have even been coming out on the warmer winter days this year, so I think we are going to have a very busy season," he said.

"Snakes will be out looking for food and water, and because there isn't much cover around we will probably be seeing a lot more - I am expecting a lot of calls to start soon."

All snakes come with the same warning label, Mr McGoldrick said.

"If you see a snake stand still, and the snake will go the other way.

"Browns can get a bit defensive if you are too close, so just slowly back away and it should go the other way."

In Australia, all native wildlife, including snakes, are protected and illegal to kill, while most bites happen when people are trying to kill or capture a snake.

"Always call a professional, but if you do get bitten stay still and try and stay calm and relaxed," Mr McGoldrick said.

"Apply a snake pressure bandage to the bite mark and call 000.

"Snakes can be anywhere, but if you are bushwalking, or in hay sheds or near water tanks wear long pants, and be aware they are around."