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Mixed response from educators towards student climate strike | Poll

TAKING A STAND: Bathurst Community Climate Action Network president Jack Fry is calling for support to reinterpret the language around climate change. Photo: SAM BOLT

TAKING A STAND: Bathurst Community Climate Action Network president Jack Fry is calling for support to reinterpret the language around climate change. Photo: SAM BOLT

Educational organisations have returned mixed responses towards students wishing to take part in next Friday's Global Climate Strike in front of the Bathurst Court House.

The nationwide event has been arranged by School Strike 4 Climate, a consortium of school students pushing for the three tiers of government to recognise climate change as a global crisis.

Bathurst is one of nearly 100 Australian cities and towns set to take part in the September 20 strike.

However, a spokesperson from the Department of Education has said any student who misses school to attend will be marked as absent.

"While we understand some students are passionate about this topic, all students who are enrolled at school are expected to attend that school whenever instruction is provided," the spokesperson said.

"Any student not in classes on a school day will be marked absent and unexplained absences may be subject to the school's disciplinary code."

The Department of Education's sentiment was shared by a Scots All Saints College spokesperson, who said "while it is important for students to have a voice on environmental issues, next Friday is a normal school day and we would expect all students to be at school as per usual."

Conversely, Charles Sturt University [CSU] released a statement on Monday clearing staff and students to attend the strike.

"CSU has a long and proud history of dedication to meaningful action on climate change and sustainability," acting vice-chancellor Professor John Germov said in the statement.

Bathurst's Catholic Education office declined to comment on the matter.

The local strike is set to be convened by the Bathurst Community Climate Action Network [BCCAN], and president Jack Fry said the event is open to people of all ages.

"This issue is not restricted to a certain age demographic, we all share this planet and anyone who's concerned about our future is invited to attend," Mr Fry said.

"We're in the midst of a climate emergency, and we want to work together with local council and organisations to recognise the seriousness of the issue."

To date, 47 local councils throughout Australia have declared a climate emergency, constituting around 20 per cent of the population.

"We need governments to get serious about climate change, and I hope Bathurst Regional Council will lead the way," Mr Fry said.

"It's healthy to be skeptical, but you have to be rigorous with the sources you choose to quote."

What do you think?