Bill Tatt: African Swine Fever big threat to livestock industry

Stock and property: Bill Tatt writes about the treat of African Swine Fever and how Dubbo Saleyards complex has been booked for a goat sale in November. Photo: File.

Stock and property: Bill Tatt writes about the treat of African Swine Fever and how Dubbo Saleyards complex has been booked for a goat sale in November. Photo: File.

Week Ending 04/10/19

As mentioned in a previous column one of the biggest threats currently to our industry other than the drought which shows no signs of abating would be the arrival on our shores of African Swine Fever.

The latest outbreak has now been confirmed in East Timor bringing the number to 10 countries in Asia alone, the disease is also rampant access parts of Europe and Africa.

The Chinese domestic consumers have seen the price of pork at sale outlets rise some 62 per cent since the beginning of June.

This shortage of protein in China has helped Australian beef exporters to the tune of a 67 per cent rise in exports for the calendar year until the end of August.

Other big winners into this lucrative market include Brazil and Argentina. America as the world's second biggest producer of pig meats should be able to fill much of the shortfall.

Much will depend on trade negotiation between the two superpowers.

Early days for this notice but the Dubbo Selling complex has been booked for a goat sale to be held on November 12.

Back to China and the impact it is having on Australia's beef exporting trajectory.

In July for the very first time China became the number one destination for our exports of beef surpassing both the United States and Japan in taking 28,214 tonnes of chilled and frozen beef, up 25 per cent on the previous best record month.

The outbreak of Swine fever has obviously helped our exporters but there are also other factors in play.

The outbreak of Swine fever has obviously helped our exporters but there are also other factors in play.

Chinese authorities have clamped down on the illegal 'grey beef trade' which is the arrival of cattle and buffalo through Vietnam and Hong Kong without any documentation.

The use in the Chinese middle class who have far greater expectations in relation to their protein intake than the previous generations has also acted as a trigger to increased demand.

Bruce Bryant of Peter Milling & Co, Wellington, reminded the writer of the upcoming 18th annual Glenwood Merino Ram Sale, account Norm and Pip Smith.

The sale features 120 SRS Poll and Horn Rams with inspections from 10am and the sale at 1pm on October 11.

The family indicated the depth of breeding in the flock when last Monday at Dubbo sale their classed-out breeder with February skin topped the mutton sale for the day at $215.20