Sculptures in the Garden is a top exhibition that's close to home

Hui Selwood's 'Pentad' was one of the 2019 installations in the Lawson Park Sculpture Walk, pictured with Council general manager, Brad Cam, SIG's Gerald Norton-Knight, mayor Des Kennedy, and SIG's Kay Norton-Knight.

Hui Selwood's 'Pentad' was one of the 2019 installations in the Lawson Park Sculpture Walk, pictured with Council general manager, Brad Cam, SIG's Gerald Norton-Knight, mayor Des Kennedy, and SIG's Kay Norton-Knight.

The annual Sculptures in the Garden - this weekend, October 12-13 - has become one of the largest and most renowned regional sculpture exhibitions in NSW, and for local artists having such an event close-by is a significant boost.

In addition to being an SIG regular, Hill End's Hui Selwood has also had a piece picked up for the Mid-Western Regional Council's public art collection and is now displayed on the Lawson Park Sculpture Walk.

The works are purchased as part of a joint venture between Council and the not-for-profit event.

'Pentad', which stands 4.5m tall, was added this year to the Short Street and Loy Avenue.

Hui was delighted that it was chosen for the walk, where "it connects with the whole community".

"It means a lot, having one of your pieces on public display is a great nod to what you do. And it's there for people to see now and in the future," he said.

"It's accessible to the public, it's not in a private collection.

"I see it as a privilege.

"And for Council to create a public collection is fantastic and quite unusual around rural NSW."

The marble and steel piece had also previously featured in the 2016 Sculpture by the Sea exhibition in Sydney. Although, Hui said that having SIG close to home is a boon.

"It's super important and it's such a fantastic event," he said.

"Although regional sculpture shows are growing - and there are more of them since the advent of Sculpture by the Sea - SIG is one of the best. Kay, Gerald and Amber Norton-Knight run it so beautifully.

"And Kay's drive has made it something quite special on the calendar."

He'll be returning in 2019 with a metal sculpture, titled 'Resurrection', which he said was inspired by life's challenges and having recently lost people close to him.

"Life is a tough road, whilst it can be very fulfilling and exciting it can also have very tough parts as well," he said.

"I've had my periods of self-reflection and this is a work about that. Many of us go through dark periods in our lives, some worse than others, and the work is called 'Resurrection' because you can go through it and come out the other side.

"And it doesn't always have to be an end, it can be an experience that you can learn from and reset your life in some ways, if dealt with correctly."