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Orange Farmers Market raises more than $2000 for bushfire relief | Photos

OUT IN SUPPORT: Isla Adams, Amelia Paterson, Tom Adams and Flynn Paterson got into the RFS spirit at Orange Farmers Market on Saturday.
OUT IN SUPPORT: Isla Adams, Amelia Paterson, Tom Adams and Flynn Paterson got into the RFS spirit at Orange Farmers Market on Saturday.

ONE of Orange's monthly staple events has contributed more than $2000 for bushfire victims.

The Rotary Club of Orange Daybreak decided to donate the takings from Orange Farmers Market to the Salvation Army's bushfire appeal.

After the gates were closed at 12pm on Saturday, the final count was $2297, with the farmers market committee also expected to make a donation.

Some people chose to donate directly to the NSW Rural Fire Service, which was at the market providing information.

Education officer and Orange North West brigade deputy captain Chris Googe said he spoke to more than 20 people during the morning.

"We had a couple of people ask about plans for getting out of the house if they're impacted by bushfire and there were a couple of comments about changing climate, but we don't get into that," he said.

Mr Googe said everyone needed a plan in place.

"The houses we lost in Lithgow, a lot of those were within the city limits," he said.

"Most rural people are good, they clean up their properties, but most people in town don't, they think because they're in the city limits, they don't need to, which is completely wrong."

OUT IN FRONT: RFS Education officer and Orange North West brigade deputy captain Chris Googe at Saturday's markets.

OUT IN FRONT: RFS Education officer and Orange North West brigade deputy captain Chris Googe at Saturday's markets.

Mr Googe said the support for the RFS during the morning was heartwarming - one girl delivered a drawing of firefighters and a truck, saying, "Thank you for hearing us and keeping us safe".

He said of the brigade's 45 active members, more than 20 had lent their time to fight fires across Glen Innes, Armidale, Tamworth, Lithgow and Mudgee and feedback from the firefronts had been mixed.

"Some said it was a fantastic experience, some thought they don't want to go away again," he said.

Mr Googe said the more experienced firefighters were used to facing the more emotionally-taxing aspects of the job.

"There will be counselling for awhile to keep their mental health right - it's going to have to be something we're conscious of going forward."