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Keep an eye out for our slithering friends below

SLITHERING FRIEND: A Highland Copperhead was spotted by Orange snake catcher Jake Hansen at O'Connell back in February. Photo: JAKE HANSEN
SLITHERING FRIEND: A Highland Copperhead was spotted by Orange snake catcher Jake Hansen at O'Connell back in February. Photo: JAKE HANSEN

With the weather warming up in recent weeks, snake experts are calling on people to keep an eye out for our slithering friends below.

While there's no fool proof way that'll guarantee no snakes coming onto your property, there are some tips that can be done to reduce the chances.

Orange Snake Service owner Jake Hansen, who has previously caught snakes in the Bathurst area, said killing snakes or getting them removed will do nothing to reduce the number of snakes on people's properties if the reasons they are there are being ignored.

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"Don't give snakes a place to hide, remove all loose ground cover," he said.

"All rubbish, logs, wood, sheets of tin and rocks have to go and if you have a rock garden seal up as many gaps and holes under the rocks.

"Check for holes and gaps going underneath concrete slabs and fill these in. Snakes won't dig holes themselves so any gaps appearing or made by other animals will be used by snakes for shelter.

"Remove overgrown vegetation that sits on the ground and rock retaining walls with overgrown vegetation and a pool or pond nearby is four-star snake heaven, particularly if they are north facing.

"Keep your grass short and pay particular attention to grass and weeds along fence lines and the walls to your home or sheds.

"Install weather strips or seals under all doors and make sure no bird seed, compost, chook feed or any other rodent attractants are left out. Anything that attracts rodents and you are basically setting up a McDonalds drive-thru for hungry eastern Brown snakes to come and hang around."

Mr Hansen said the best thing to do if there's a snake on your property is to stand back and watch it, as it will eventually move on.

"If you can detach yourself from the disproportionate sense of fear we feel towards snakes, they really are pretty fascinating animals to watch," he said.

"If you live in town or have pets or young children then I certainly understand a person's reluctance to have a snake around and so in this case you should have the snake relocated by someone experienced in handling venomous snakes.

"Be sure to watch it from a distance until the snake catcher can arrive."

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