Trespassers create 'major issues' for Central West farmers

SHOW RESPECT: Blayney Shire Councillor Bruce Reynolds is asking both tourists and locals to keep out of private property. Photo: Supplied
SHOW RESPECT: Blayney Shire Councillor Bruce Reynolds is asking both tourists and locals to keep out of private property. Photo: Supplied

With canola crops in bloom across the Central West, landholders are asking both tourists and locals not to venture onto properties without obtaining permission first.

While the trampling of canola crops by tourists seeking the perfect social media snap has been less of a problem this season, trespassing remains an ongoing frustration for farmers, according to Blayney Shire Councillor Bruce Reynolds.

"The Blayney Shire Council had problems last year between Lyndhurst and Cowra with people breaking into canola crops and trampling them," Cr Reynolds said.

"But it's a bigger issue than canola," he added.

"I had a landholder ring me over the weekend to say that people had gone through his gates to go fishing.

"(They) broke into his property to go fishing on his dam. But it's a private dam and people didn't ask."

Cr Reynolds believed that many of those who had been venturing onto private property to fish, hunt or ride dirt bikes were locals.

"It is private property and people should be respecting private property. People wouldn't like people walking into their loungeroom or going into your backyard, so it's no difference with farmland," he said.

The other big concern for landholders who ran stock was the dangers trespassers might be putting themselves in by venturing into their paddocks, such as from bulls or cows protecting calves.

In addition, trespassers could interfere with animals that were lambing or calving - separating the new-borns from their mothers or vice versa, he explained.

"They won't match back up again if they've been newly born," he said.

"There's a number of reasons you don't just want people on your property... People coming in could be carrying weed or animal diseases on their boots.

"It's not just because you're trampling (crops). You could be creating major problems for the landholder."

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