Top prices for Merino ewes at Forbes sale

Bill Tatt says if recent sales results are anything to go by, there is no indication that prices for sheep and cattle are coming off the boil.

Bill Tatt says if recent sales results are anything to go by, there is no indication that prices for sheep and cattle are coming off the boil.

The 42 nd Annual First Cross Merino Ewe sale at Forbes started the selling season with an outstanding result.

The best of the unjoined first Cross Ewes reached $453, while their older sisters scanned in lamb reached a healthy $470.00.

The entire sale for young, old and Merino Ewes averaged $361.00.

The top draft of Merino Ewes, March/April 2020 drop, October shorn sold for an impressive $432.00.

One family sold their entire 2020 drop of young first Cross Ewes totalling 2100 for an average price of $397.00.

As the selling season progresses this will give other saleyards and alternative selling platforms some prices to beat if they wish to be called the top dog in the store sheep selling arena.

Some recently released figures on foreign ownership of Australian farming and grazing lands show that China for the second consecutive year is the major owner of our rural acreage standing at 9,199,000 ha which is an investment increase of 0.5% over the previous year.

The Chinese are followed by the United Kingdom with 8,166,000 ha which has decreased by 9.5%.

The Dutch, Canadians and Americans round out the top five and all these nationalities have marginally increased their holdings.

Surprisingly Tasmania showed the greatest increase percentage wise of

foreign ownership with the Northern Territory and Queensland bringing up the rear.

If I can correctly correlate all the figures, foreign identities control or have a major say in almost 14% of our farms.

Since virtually the first fleet, Australia has received and welcomed many forms of foreign financial investments to help in the growth of this country.

Photos, page 8.

Photos, page 8.

My only personal condemnation of this is that any country wishing to invest in our rural lands should have reciprocal arrangements allowing us to have ownership under similar terms in their country.

Dubbo on January 14 saw a draw of 750 cattle in a market that was much stronger than the opening sale at Troy, in line with reports coming out of the weaner sales in the south, there is no sign of prices starting to wane.