YLAD Living Soils and YLAD Living Compost assist in farmer education

CALL TO ACTION: YLAD Living Soils' Bill Daly and Rhea Winter-Irving standing in a cover crop on Milgadara sown with humus extracted liquid tea as liquid injection.

CALL TO ACTION: YLAD Living Soils' Bill Daly and Rhea Winter-Irving standing in a cover crop on Milgadara sown with humus extracted liquid tea as liquid injection.

Never in Australia's history has it become more apparent that climate change is part of the conundrum facing Australian agricultural production and vice-versa.

You cannot talk one without the other, because the interplay is so connected.

"We have lost up to 60 per cent of soil organic carbon since white settlement due to conventional farming methods, adding to the legacy load of atmospheric carbon that has slowly climbing to over 412 ppm and temperature increases reaching 1.2 degrees," YLAD Living Soils founder and managing director Rhonda Daly said.

"We are ill prepared for the implications of the temperature rise on agricultural production, yet we forge blindly with our head in the sand thinking that nothing is going to happen to us, while disaster after disaster continues to occur such as fires, floods and droughts.

"Horrendous that despite science, technology, and this knowledge we are still losing 16 football fields every hour to soil degradation and one species becomes extinct every 20 minutes due to the way to continue to farm for soils."

There is, however, a win-win for both farmers and society; by recognising the role living soils have in sequestering atmospheric carbon into the soil, reducing the effects of climate change while increasing productivity by 30 per cent for farmers, Rhonda says.

This year marks the 20th anniversary of Rhonda and Bill Daly co-founding YLAD Living Soils and YLAD Living Compost, assisting in farmer education and adoption of biological-regenerative farming and humus compost production.

"Farmers have a huge role to play in improving the health of our soil and environment, leading to the sequestration of atmospheric carbon and reduction of GHG emissions," Rhonda said.

"Farmers are the only hope for Australia to reach net zero by 2050.

"What is needed is a transformation of our production system to make it more productive, input efficient and to lower our environmental footprint."

There is no time like now to act to avert further climate and environmental disasters.

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